Sports

Peteca – Everything About This Unknown Shuttlecock Sport From Brazil

peteca

Peteca is a popular sport in Brazil that originated in the indigenous communities of the country. The sport is played with a small, lightweight shuttlecock-like object called a peteca, which is struck with the hand.

Peteca is similar to the sports of badminton and volleyball, but it has its own unique set of rules and techniques. The game is played on a court with a net separating the two teams. Each team consists of one or two players, and the objective is to hit the peteca over the net and into the opposing team’s side of the court without them being able to return it. Points are scored when a team is unable to return the peteca, or if it hits the ground on their side of the court.

One of the unique aspects of peteca is that players are not allowed to use their feet to hit the peteca. Instead, they must use their hands, which adds an element of skill and precision to the game. Peteca is also typically played with a softer and slower shuttlecock, which allows for longer rallies and a greater emphasis on strategy.

Peteca is a popular recreational activity in Brazil, and it is also played competitively at the national and international level. The Brazilian Peteca Confederation, or CBP, is the governing body for the sport in the country and organizes national tournaments and teams.

In addition to its popularity in Brazil, peteca has also gained popularity in other parts of the world, particularly in countries in South and Central America. It has even been played in the Pan American Games and the World Beach Games.

Peteca Rules

The official rules of Peteca, as established by the International Peteca Association (IPA), are as follows:

  1. The court is a rectangular area measuring 13.4 meters long and 6.1 meters wide.
  2. The net is placed across the center of the court, with a height of 2.03 meters for men and 1.98 meters for women.
  3. The shuttlecock, or “peteca,” must be made of feathers and rubber and weigh between 20 and 25 grams.
  4. A match is typically played as the best of three sets, and each set is played to 21 points. A team must win by two points.
  5. The serve is taken diagonally, with the server standing behind the baseline on their right side. The receiver must let the shuttlecock fall to the ground before they can hit it back.
  6. Points are scored when the shuttlecock touches the ground on the opponent’s side of the court, when it is hit out of bounds, or when the opponent fails to hit it before it touches the ground.
  7. Players are not allowed to catch or hold the shuttlecock with their racket, and they are only allowed to hit it once before it crosses the net.
  8. Players can only play with one racket.

10 Fun Facts about Peteca

  1. Peteca is a popular sport in Brazil that originated in the indigenous communities of the country.
  2. Peteca is played with a small, lightweight shuttlecock-like object called a peteca, which is struck with the hand.
  3. Peteca is similar to the sports of badminton and volleyball, but it has its own unique set of rules and techniques.
  4. Peteca is played on a court with a net separating the two teams, which can consist of one or two players.
  5. The objective of the game is to hit the peteca over the net and into the opposing team’s side of the court without them being able to return it.
  6. Players are not allowed to use their feet to hit the peteca, only their hands.
  7. Peteca is typically played with a softer and slower shuttlecock, which allows for longer rallies and a greater emphasis on strategy.
  8. Peteca is a popular recreational activity in Brazil and is also played competitively at the national and international level.
  9. The Brazilian Peteca Confederation, or CBP, is the governing body for the sport in the country and organizes national tournaments and teams.
  10. Peteca has gained popularity in other parts of the world, particularly in South and Central America, and has been played in the Pan American Games and the World Beach Games.
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